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No Stone Unturned ~ Robert’s Road to Recovery

Robert on the day he received his Masters Degree in Music

Robert on the day he received his Masters Degree in Music

My name is Angela Bolton and I started this blog to tell the story of my husband Robert’s progress after suffering a post-operative cardiac arrest which led to hypoxic brain injury (October 2011).

Now that we have had Bob SMART assessed and he’s comfortable at the Royal Hospital Donnybrook, this blog is now my way of communicating with him, and anyone interested in his well-being: our friends and family from abroad and our good friends in SJUH, the NRH and the RHD.

Bob’s an incredibly special person, and my whole world collapsed when he sustained his injury. I had lost the best part of myself and my future, and didn’t know what to do. The challenge of getting him into proper assessment took so much of my energy that when it was achieved, I seemed to have no other life.

I’m trying to rebuild that life and do what I can for both of us.

Thank you so much for reading this blog. All the kindness and consideration I’ve received over the last two years can never be repaid but I promise I’ll be kinder to others, maybe try to be a bit more patient, and learn from what I now know: that people, at their best, are amazing.

——– oOo ——–

Links to media coverage:

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Links to early posts:

About

Bob playing his Fender Precision Bass with the Two-Tec bridge (which means it weighs a ton), San Diego (Brad Kirkbride on drums)

 I hope this is going to be the story of how we get Robert the medical care he needs. There are a lot of people being short-changed by the State because of lack of funding for essential treatment. The recent story of a woman who wasn’t getting the medication she needed to treat life-threatening skin cancer – highlighted by the media – is just one of many examples. The fact that a person has to ‘fight’ to get these treatments is shameful in a country that, until recently, was awash with money being spent on voting machines or padded pensions and golden handshakes for public servants who effectively didn’t do their jobs properly.
 
We know the resources aren’t being provided to the health system by the Government, and whilst the professionals we have met would be only too happy to give Robert what he needs, they simply don’t have the money.
 
Through this blog we might help to highlight the lack of funds for essential services; maybe someone with influence who reads it may take a special interest, or possibly we’ll even get our own ‘secret millionare’ who’ll fund Robert’s assessment and rehabilitation. I guess that’s a stretch of the imagination, but we live and dream. And hope.

8 Comments

Leave a Comment
  1. Rick Furay / Jul 18 2012 3:46 pm

    Thanks for helping out, excellent info .

  2. reverse phone / Jul 21 2012 1:49 am

    Hello. impressive job. I did not anticipate this. This is often a great story.
    Thanks!

  3. Brendan Flynn / Aug 20 2012 10:14 pm

    We know exactly how you feel because we have been there and we are still going through hell. We have followed the same path even down to visiting the Royal in Putney and we have got the same answers from the HSE. Our son , also named Robert, survived SADS, a miracle in itself, but surviving our health system could require a bigger feat. From reading your story, Robert Bolton couldn’t have a stronger person working for him and we will gladly offer any help we can from our experience.

  4. Eloise / Dec 29 2012 9:59 pm

    Hello just wanted to give you a quick heads up. The words in your article seem
    to be running off the screen in Opera. I’m not sure if this is a formatting issue or something to do with web browser compatibility but I figured I’d post
    to let you know. The layout look great though!
    Hope you get the issue solved soon. Thanks

    • angelavbolton / Dec 29 2012 11:16 pm

      Hi Eloise, must be a browser compatibility issue ~ looks fine when I view it. Thank you for reading the blog, though, and I hope it was of interest to you. Began as a way to reach out to people but became a labour of love, especially on the nights when I was out of my mind with fear and despair wondering how in the hell people get through times like this. This is how they do it – by telling their story and trying to find every single way to help the one they love: it’s what’s kept me from running out of hope. People who’ve heard the radio interview or read the articles in the Irish Times or Southside People have been so kind and full of help and advice. It’s humbling and inspiring, and kept me going for 15 months. Robert is still with us and will continue to be as long as I have any say in the matter. God bless and take care. Angela

  5. newspaper articles / Jan 4 2013 9:47 am

    Hello there! Would you mind if I share your blog with my zynga group?
    There’s a lot of folks that I think would really appreciate your content. Please let me know. Thanks

    • angelavbolton / Jan 4 2013 9:51 am

      Thank you, I’d be happy for you to share it with whoever you feel would be interested. I appreciate your asking. Best regards, Angela

  6. micromax mobile games / Apr 11 2014 9:40 am

    Greetings! Very useful advice in this particular article!
    It is the little changes that produce the greatest changes.
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